Cashmere Lab

Cashmere Lab

Introducing the cashmere lab - learn more about the knit techniques and cashmere care.

Introducing the cashmere lab - learn more about the knit techniques and cashmere care.

01. This is Cashmere

01.1 Cashmere Fibres – the source
01.2 Cashmere Fibres – the key qualities

01.3 Finished cashmere – specification


02. Cashmere Care

02.1 Washing 

02.2 Drying 

02.3 Ironing

02.4 Storing

02.5 Pilling


03. Cashmere 2.0

03.1 Plain Knit
03.2 Fine Knit (plain)
03.3 Paddington Rib Fine Knit

03.4 Double-Face Cashmere

03.5 Terry Knit

01. This is Cashmere

01.1 Cashmere Fibres – the source
01.2 Cashmere Fibres – the key qualities

01.3 Finished cashmere – specification


02. Cashmere Care

02.1 Washing 

02.2 Drying 

02.3 Ironing

02.4 Storing

02.5 Pilling


03. Cashmere 2.0

03.1 Plain Knit
03.2 Fine Knit (plain)
03.3 Paddington Rib Fine Knit

03.4 Double-Face Cashmere

03.5 Terry Knit

01. This is Cashmere 


01.1 Cashmere Fibres – the source 

Capra Hircus goats (cashmere goats), native to Inner Mongolia, are acclimatised to the harsh, extremely cold winters they live through. To protect from temperatures as low as -30°C, the goats grow a very soft, fine and smooth downy hair below their long and relatively coarse hair. As temperatures rise in the Spring, herders carefully hand-comb the goats to collect the fine fibres, which would otherwise shed naturally. 


Cashmere goats produce a limited volume of these fibres each year, no more than 200g per goat. An average sweater requires two to five goats’ hair for production, illustrating the exclusive nature of cashmere.

01. This is Cashmere 


01.1 Cashmere Fibres – the source 

Capra Hircus goats (cashmere goats), native to Inner Mongolia, are acclimatised to the harsh, extremely cold winters they live through. To protect from temperatures as low as -30°C, the goats grow a very soft, fine and smooth downy hair below their long and relatively coarse hair. As temperatures rise in the Spring, herders carefully hand-comb the goats to collect the fine fibres, which would otherwise shed naturally. 


Cashmere goats produce a limited volume of these fibres each year, no more than 200g per goat. An average sweater requires two to five goats’ hair for production, illustrating the exclusive nature of cashmere. 

01.2 Cashmere Fibres – the key qualities 


01.2.1 Length and Fineness 

The longer the fibre length, the better - longer fibres will reduce the volume of pilling as shorter fibres more easily loosen from the surface of the piece. Cashmere fibres are very fine - with an average diameter of less than 19 microns, compared to human hair which is 60-120 microns in diameter. 


01.2.2 Insulation 

Although extremely fine, cashmere fibres are hollow, making them light weight and able to adjust to temperature. During winter, the air chambers trap heat from the body to prevent it escaping, and insulates the wearer over eight times better than wool.


In warmer months, the hygroscopic cashmere wicks moisture away from the skin and creates a cooling effect and making it comfortable in all climates. 

01.2 Cashmere Fibres – the key qualities 


01.2.1 Length and Fineness 

The longer the fibre length, the better - longer fibres will reduce the volume of pilling as shorter fibres more easily loosen from the surface of the piece. Cashmere fibres are very fine - with an average diameter of less than 19 microns, compared to human hair which is 60-120 microns in diameter. 


01.2.2 Insulation 

Although extremely fine, cashmere fibres are hollow, making them light weight and able to adjust to temperature. During winter, the air chambers trap heat from the body to prevent it escaping, and insulates the wearer over eight times better than wool.


In warmer months, the hygroscopic cashmere wicks moisture away from the skin and creates a cooling effect and making it comfortable in all climates. 

01.3 Finished cashmere – specification 

01.3.1 Ply 

The ply refers to the number of threads twined together to make a single piece of cashmere yarn. If two threads are combined, this is known as 2 ply cashmere. For three - 3 ply, and so on. 


01.3.2 Gauge 

The gauge refers to how tightly the cashmere has been knitted which is measured by stitches per inch. The higher the gauge number, the finer the piece. A 16 gauge sweater is considered a featherweight, fine knit piece, whilst 5 gauge has a visibly thicker look and feel. 

01.3 Finished cashmere – specification 

01.3.1 Ply 

The ply refers to the number of threads twined together to make a single piece of cashmere yarn. If two threads are combined, this is known as 2 ply cashmere. For three - 3 ply, and so on. 


01.3.2 Gauge 

The gauge refers to how tightly the cashmere has been knitted which is measured by stitches per inch. The higher the gauge number, the finer the piece. A 16 gauge sweater is considered a featherweight, fine knit piece, whilst 5 gauge has a visibly thicker look and feel. 

02. Cashmere Care

We are proud that all LISA YANG collections meet the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) for cashmere, which assures 100% organic cashmere. Through certified, responsible environmental and social practises, our cashmere and the production processes are held to the highest, accountable standards.

We believe that you should be able to wear your pieces for decades to come, and through small, simple everyday steps, you can continue the care of your LISA YANG cashmere.



02.1 Washing

You won’t need to wash your cashmere after each wear, but do ensure your pieces are kept clean to avoid attracting any moths. We recommend hand-washing at home using a special cashmere wash. Alternatively, using a washing machine with a delicates, hand-wash or wool setting with a maximum temperature of 30°C and no spin. Do place your piece in a laundry bag before adding to the machine.

Alternatively, use a dry-clean service if there are any stains or more substantial cleaning required.



02.2 Drying

Dry your cashmere by laying the piece flat on a towel, rolling it loosely, lightly press and then allow to air-dry flat.



02.3 Ironing

To remove creases from your cashmere, turn the piece inside-out and lay flat. Turn the iron to the lowest heat setting, and avoid direct contact between the iron and the cashmere by laying a damp cloth between them. If using a hand-held steamer, keep some distance be- tween the hot face and the cashmere.



02.4 Storing

Store your cashmere in a cool, preferably dark drawer or shelf space. Keep your piece fold- ed, hanging will risk it losing its shape. Ceder wood balls are a natural repellent to moths, replace them annually. For longer periods of storage, use a breathable bag to hold your cashmere.



02.5 Pilling

Some pilling is normal, due to the friction of everyday wear against the loose fibres on the piece’s surface. Using the LISA YANG cashmere comb, lay the piece flat and gently brush away any pills.


Write to us at customerservice@lisa-yang.com if you have any questions on caring for your cashmere.

02. Cashmere Care

We are proud that all LISA YANG collections meet the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) for cashmere, which assures 100% organic cashmere. Through certified, responsible environmental and social practises, our cashmere and the production processes are held to the highest, accountable standards.

We believe that you should be able to wear your pieces for decades to come, and through small, simple everyday steps, you can continue the care of your LISA YANG cashmere.



02.1 Washing

You won’t need to wash your cashmere after each wear, but do ensure your pieces are kept clean to avoid attracting any moths. We recommend hand-washing at home using a special cashmere wash. Alternatively, using a washing machine with a delicates, hand-wash or wool setting with a maximum temperature of 30°C and no spin. Do place your piece in a laundry bag before adding to the machine.

Alternatively, use a dry-clean service if there are any stains or more substantial cleaning required.



02.2 Drying

Dry your cashmere by laying the piece flat on a towel, rolling it loosely, lightly press and then allow to air-dry flat.



02.3 Ironing

To remove creases from your cashmere, turn the piece inside-out and lay flat. Turn the iron to the lowest heat setting, and avoid direct contact between the iron and the cashmere by laying a damp cloth between them. If using a hand-held steamer, keep some distance be- tween the hot face and the cashmere.



02.4 Storing

Store your cashmere in a cool, preferably dark drawer or shelf space. Keep your piece fold- ed, hanging will risk it losing its shape. Ceder wood balls are a natural repellent to moths, replace them annually. For longer periods of storage, use a breathable bag to hold your cashmere.



02.5 Pilling

Some pilling is normal, due to the friction of everyday wear against the loose fibres on the piece’s surface. Using the LISA YANG cashmere comb, lay the piece flat and gently brush away any pills.


Write to us at customerservice@lisa-yang.com if you have any questions on caring for your cashmere.

03. Cashmere 2.0 


As an innovative design house, we experiment, evolve and enhance luxury techniques to create a wardrobe made entirely from cashmere. 

03. Cashmere 2.0 


As an innovative design house, we experiment, evolve and enhance luxury techniques to create a wardrobe made entirely from cashmere. 

03.1 Plain Knit 

03.1.1 Light-weight 12 gauge pieces for everyday and season-less wardrobe signatures. 

03.1.2 Mid-weight 7 gauge pieces for a thicker hand-feel for greater insulation and weight. 

03.1.3 Heavy-weight 3 to 5 gauge pieces optimal for winter months. 

03.1 Plain Knit 

03.1.1 Light-weight 12 gauge pieces for everyday and season-less wardrobe signatures. 

03.1.2 Mid-weight 7 gauge pieces for a thicker hand-feel for greater insulation and weight. 

03.1.3 Heavy-weight 3 to 5 gauge pieces optimal for winter months. 

03.2 Fine Knit (plain) 

Silk-like fine knit cashmere in a 16gg is the lightest weight knit in LY collection. Selecting the highest quality fibres is necessary to achieve the drape and functionality of pieces in fine knit cashmere. 

03.2 Fine Knit (plain) 

Silk-like fine knit cashmere in a 16gg is the lightest weight knit in LY collection. Selecting the highest quality fibres is necessary to achieve the drape and functionality of pieces in fine knit cashmere. 

03.3 Paddington Rib Fine Knit 

Characterised by the flat, raised, and wide-ribbed panels, paddington fine knit cashmere affords structural definition despite the ultra light weight feel. Pieces in paddington fine knit drape with the body and give a true ‘second skin’ feel - the rib stretches and bends with the body (almost like there is elastic/nylon in the blend).

03.3 Paddington Rib Fine Knit 

Characterised by the flat, raised, and wide-ribbed panels, paddington fine knit cashmere affords structural definition despite the ultra light weight feel. Pieces in paddington fine knit drape with the body and give a true ‘second skin’ feel - the rib stretches and bends with the body (almost like there is elastic/nylon in the blend).

03.4 Double-Face Cashmere 

Two sides of cashmere are sewn together to form a double-faced fabric, giving a lining that mirrors the outside layer. Keeping an incredible lightness, the double-faced fabric adds structure to tailoring pieces made entirely from cashmere retaining the soft drape. 

03.4 Double-Face Cashmere 

Two sides of cashmere are sewn together to form a double-faced fabric, giving a lining that mirrors the outside layer. Keeping an incredible lightness, the double-faced fabric adds structure to tailoring pieces made entirely from cashmere retaining the soft drape. 

03.5 Terry Knit

Inspired by the Terry loop synonymous with towelling-texture, the Terry knit technique gives an incredibly soft, voluminous yet light weight feel.

03.5 Terry Knit

Inspired by the Terry loop synonymous with towelling-texture, the Terry knit technique gives an incredibly soft, voluminous yet light weight feel.